Frida the Fashion Icon

Everyone has at least one famous person they admire. For some it’s an influential industrialist likeHoward Hughes. For others it’s a writer like Ernest Hemingway. There are a handful of celebrities that I idolize and have spent years learning about. One of them is Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).

My interest in Kahlo was sparked by a love for art and art history. Kahlo was aggressive and played by her own rules. And though her life was filled with tragedy she never allowed it to conquer her spirit. She was a vivacious, strong-minded, and passionate woman. As a woman, I heartily respect that.
One of Kahlo’s many qualities that I most admire was that her canvas wasn’t the only place where she expressed her creativity. She lived her art and it was apparent in her appearance.

I (like many) consider Kahlo a fashion icon. She had such a unique way of dressing. She wore indigenous Mexican attire but added her own twist– weaving roses through her braided hair and accessorizing with chunky jewelry. While times were changing and women’s fashion was evolving, she continued to wear traditional tehuana skirts (see right) and wrapped herself in vibrant rebozos.

I chose to devote this posting to Frida Kahlo’s style as a way to illustrate how traditional Mexican garments have made their way into contemporary fashion. Kahlo’s revolutionary “look” has become the inspiration for many designers.

Noted fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier produced an entire collection inspired by her style. In that collection he showcased several corsets, which fashion critics believed to be inspired by the ones Kahlo had to wear to support her spine following a near-fatal accident. Christian Dior, Moschino, and Christian Lacroix have also shown designs influenced by Kahlo’s style. Harper’s Bazaar magazine featured a fashion spread inspired by Kahlo. The model had a garland of red flowers in her hair and wore white blouses and embroidered skirts reminiscent of Kahlo’s style.


Real pic. of Frida Kahlo.

Good Luck!

U.

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Legendary Yves Saint Laurent!

He says little more than “yes” and “no” as the panel tries to figure out who he is and he tries to figure out what the heck all these goofy Americans are even talking about. Whole sentence, “Je suis enchanté de vous voir” means “I’m happy to meet you”. It is interesting to observe young future legend. You also might notice than his eyes are a little bit crazy and also he feels unconfident becouse of foreign language.

Yves Saint Laurent holds up a drawing of his cocktail dress design that won him first prize in 1953 in a fashion drawing competition in Paris. His success in the contest led to his job with the Christian Dior team of designers.

“Fashion come and go but style is eternal.” These immortal words were spoken by Yves Saint Laurent himself. He created style….not fashion.

We’ve visited the Yves Saint Laurent exhibition at the de Young museum in San Francisco and were amazed how the master couturier, with such magnificent genius, redefined modern women’s wear.
Seeing a picture or a video of something is very different from seeing the same exact thing in front of your eyes. The beauty of the over 120 ensembles exposed is most definitely of every fashion and art fan’s enjoyment. Hope someday I will also visit this place!

Yves Saint Laurent: The man who changed the way women dress forever.

Best wishes!

U.

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The little Black Dress..

The little black dress was first introduced by Coco Chanel in 1920 and became one of the most popular choices of dresses to be worn by women. Fashion trends may change but the little black dress always remains the iconic dress and a must have a piece that every girl needs and and in their wardrobe. Skimming, flattering and always has that edge of sophistication.

A simple style or that ultra-glamourous dress will make you feel sexy, powerful and very much in control. It associates with the stylish, liberated new woman..and looks stunning in a black flirty dress. You know that you’ll get all the attention and you want the compliments that you deserve. How often do you hear that some hot new trend being descibed as “The New Black” Often enough, though truly there will never be a new black. At least not until many generations have past and culture around the world has been entirely transformed. So deep are the associations with the colour black that wearing the colour in your clothing immediately sets the tone for your look.

GO GOTH:

This season one look dominated the Goth look. Amidst luxurious dresses and girls skirts, designer exhibited an affinity towards the dark side this season. From flowing silhouettes to long spider web like knits, these styles unleash the inner Goth in all of us. This season one look dominated: black is the new black.


On this day in 2006, the Hubert Givenchy black dress Audrey Hepburn wore in Breakfast at Tiffany’s sold at auction for more than $800,000, more than seven times the estimated price.

The story behind the costumes and fashion of Breakfast at Tiffany’s is a Hollywood legend, a sartorial battle of egos between the American (Edith Head), the French (Givenchy) and British (Hepburn). The latter two were the victors, with their impeccable tastes not only joining forces but helping to define the style of an era.

The allure of the little black dress was once summed up by Christian Dior who said: ‘You can wear black in any moment of the day, no matter your age. You can wear black with almost any occasion. A black dress is essential for every woman.’

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50 лет эстетическому шоку советских граждан

50 лет назад, в 1959 году дом моды “Кристиан Диор”привез в Москву одну из своих коллекций одежды.
К тому времени главой известного бренда был не менее прославленный кутюрье – Ив Сен Лоран.
Отправив манекенщиц на улицы Москвы, в ГУМ и на один из столичных рынков, французы сделали
серию фотографий,опубликованных даже в журнале Life.

Тот эстетический шок, который испытали граждане Советского Союза, глядя на парижских красоток в их”заморских” одеждах, не требует комментариев – потрясенные лица запечатлел беспристрастный объектив фотокамеры Говарда Сочурека. Вероятно, так сегодня бы восприняли контакт с инопланетянами …

У.

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Fashion = Advertisement

Anyone adept in the craft of storytelling in whatever medium, knows you need time to set up a good story. Characters have to be introduced, the plot gradually unfolds, and little by little the scene is set. This is why the very first episode of a television series is rarely the best, as an audience need to digest some basic information about characters and context in the first stage of the plot. In screenwriting terms, the revelation of background information about characters is referred to as ‘exposition’.

When it comes to traditional fashion formats, there is little time and space for such expositions. Fashion rather work with seconds than minutes. It is are driven by first and immediate impression rather than long-format storytelling. And increasingly, fashion is designed to deliver hard and fast impact, as people become experts at avoiding, ignoring and filtering out advertising messages.

kapiti-designer-ice-cream-campaign

U.

Have a sunny day***

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Laura Laine’s Fashion Illustrations

Laura Laine is an amazingly talented fashion illustrator. She has studied fashion design at the University of Art and Design Helsinki, with a focus on fashion illustration. After completing her studies she has been working full-time as a freelance illustrator. Her clients include Zara, Tommy Hilfiger, H&M, Iben Hoej, Daniel Palillo, The New York Times Magazine, Elle Girl, The Guardian, and Páp Magazine.

Her predominantly black and white illustrations are hauntingly beautiful and delicate, but they sometimes have a rather dark or even eccentric, burtonesque feel to them. One of the main characteristics of her drawings is the incredibly fine and detailed line work, which manages to suggest a great variety of textures (fur, silk, wool, leather etc.). Further, there is a certain motion quality to her illustrations which is conveyed by the gracefully twisted body postures and the splendidly flowing long hair of her characters.

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